May 18, 2017

From Beehives to Nuts: Agriculture Theft is Lucrative Criminal Business in California

Think large scale criminal theft is unique to big cities?  Think again.

In California, agriculture theft is a very lucrative criminal business, and can be difficult to prove and prosecute.  Why so difficult?  Tulare (California) County Sherriff Mike Boudreaux pretty much summed up the difficulty when he stated last year:
“I can pull over a car with 20 lbs. of methamphetamine in it and that driver’s going to jail. I pull over 30,000 lbs. of pistachios, I have to prove that those are stolen, otherwise the guy goes on his way.”
Did you know that by value, food and beverage theft is now greater in the United States than theft of electronics?


Take stolen beehives, for instance.  Nearly $1,000,000 of beehives have been stolen throughout Central California over the past 3 years.  Authorities believe they have broken up the beehive theft ring, after hives from numerous beekeepers were found in Fresno, California, literally hiding in plain sight in a vacant lot.

The alleged mastermind, former Sacramento, California bee keeper Pavel Tveretinov, was arrested … and released on $10,000 bail.

Yep, suspected of stealing beehives worth nearly $1,000,000, yet let go on a measly $10,000 bail.  Does anyone think that amount of bail is going to deter Tveretinov from continuing to criminally participate in California’s lucrative agricultural theft rings?  I sure don't.

Oh, and don’t forget nuts.

During 6 months last year, $10,000,000 of almonds, pistachios, cashews, pecans, and walnuts were stolen from Central California nut growers and processors.  Some nuts were recovered, including walnuts still in the storage bins clearly marked “Diamond”.  Yep, the walnut perps were too dumb to remove the stolen walnuts from the processor’s containers.  But, most of the stolen nuts were never recovered.

And California avocados?  Green Gold to criminals.  Avocado growers in San Diego County, home to the majority of California avocado farms, incur thefts of 20,000 to 80,000 avocados each year.  Picked right from the trees at night by criminals.  And many avocado growers are small family farms.

Honeybee swarm in my backyard.
They stayed around for about 18 hours, then left as quickly as they arrived.



The next time you become irritated  about the high cost of food, don’t immediately throw blame on the farmer, middlemen, or your grocery store.  Think about the criminal theft component of food’s cost.  And if you see cheaper-than-can-be-believed prices for food items at a flea market, farmers market, or a roadside vendor, there just might be a reason - as in stolen - the food is so cheap.

Insurance, Tax, or Financial Concerns?

Mary Rae Fouts, EA, CFP assists nationwide clients that have complex or technical insurance, tax, and financial concerns, including concerns related to insurance coverage for liability and theft risks.  For more information about Mary's fee-only Consulting, Tax, and Expert Witness Services visit Fouts Financial Group.

Mary Rae Fouts

4 comments:

  1. What happens to $10 million of stolen nuts? Too much to sell on the roadside.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A few possabilities: Sold to other commercial processors, sold at farmers markets, sold at roadside stands and at street corners, sold at flea markets.

      Delete
  2. Shoot the bastards. That would help with theft.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No comment from me, but a number of farmers and ranchers likely agree with you.

      Delete