May 15, 2017

Clothes Dryer Fires: When did you last inspect your clothes dryer vent?


I've posted before about residential fire safety and the importance of adequate fire insurance.  As I remind my insurance clients, fire safety is so very important in the home, including adequate fire extinguishers in visible locations, working smoke detectors, smart living practices (such as not leaving a pan of hot oil and French fries unattended on a stove), and emergency exit route plans.

But one thing I've yet to talk about on this blog is your clothes dryer.

When is the last time you checked your clothes dryer vent for lint buildup?  Or have you ever checked your clothes dryer vent for lint buildup?

If its been a while, or if you've never checked it (Don't worry, I won't tell anyone!), one piece of advice:

Check your clothes dryer and dryer vent for lint buildup.
Now.

Clean out any lint buildup in your inside dryer vent, outside dryer exhaust vent , and inside the dryer itself.  Before doing so, be sure to unplug the electrical plugin, and turn off gas if you have a gas dryer.   Also, pop off the bottom panel (you may need to use the claw of a hammer to get if off), and clean out any residual lint on the bottom of the dryer.

Clogged Dryer Vent
Photo credit:  windychimney.com

Clogged Outside Dryer Exhaust Vent
Photo credit:  DFW Dryer Vent Cleaners
Why?  Dryer lint is highly flammable.  When trapped in a dryer vent or outside dryer exhaust vent, the decreased airflow and buildup of heat can pose a very dangerous fire hazard.

Just how dangerous are lint-clogged dryers, dryer vents, and outside dryer exhaust vents?  According to this publication, Clothes Dryer Fires in Residential Buildings (2008-2010) by the U.S. Fire Administration National Fire Data Center, approximately 2900 clothes dryer fires occur in residential buildings in the United States each year.  Based on data during the 2-year time frame, clothes dryer fires annually cause an estimated 5 deaths, 100 injuries, and many millions of dollars in property damage.

And the leading cause of clothes dryer fires?  A lint clogged dryer vent.

Residential fire safety can be easily and safely implemented with simple procedures and plans, including routine clothes dryer maintenance.  Stay safe, everyone.

Tax, Insurance, or Financial Concerns?

Mary Rae Fouts, EA, CFP assists nationwide clients that have complex or technical tax, insurance, and financial concerns.  For more information about Mary's fee-only Tax, Consulting, and Expert Witness Services visit Fouts Financial Group.

Mary Rae Fouts

6 comments:

  1. That is gross.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Agree. I bet most people do not regularly check their dryer vents, if at all. Hopefully that will change.

      Delete
  2. have never checked my dryer. Maybe that is why my dryer smells bad.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Any "bad" of dank smell could very well be due to a build of of lint.

      Delete
  3. Not all fabrics lint so why should you have to check your dryer.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Just because a particular fabric does not form lint does not mean that lint-like particles are absent. Dog hair, human hair, threads, dust, you name it.

      Delete