September 12, 2016

Driscoll's: If you like berries, here's the latest from Driscoll's, the king of berry growers.

Got Berries?

Driscoll's does!

Family-owned Driscoll's, based in Watsonville, California, has been growing berries since the late 1800's.  That's a LOT of berries!  Very interesting article in the New York Times about Driscoll's marketing and social media outreach directly targeting the consumer, and the company's research and berry growing efforts to bring exclusive berries to the consumer.

I purchase Driscoll's raspberries and blackberries at my local Lunardi's Market.  Don't purchase their strawberries, as I grow my own.


Organically Grown Strawberries from my own Gardens

I love to garden, and grow organic flowers, roses, strawberries, herbs, vegetables, and fruit and nut trees year round.  Gardening keeps me grounded in life, I thrive knowing that my gardens will always be here for nurturing and tending.  I so appreciate the many facets of gardening:   the work involved; the bountiful roses, flowers, and produce; and the ongoing challenges of Mother Nature.

Workers hand picking Driscoll's berries
Photo Credit:  New York Times

And speaking of work, what most impacted me in this article was the photo of workers hand picking berries.  Yes, hand picking; Driscoll's berries are not machine harvested.  How many people actually think about where their food comes from, how it is processed, how animals and workers are treated?

The next time you purchase Driscoll's berries, please don't forget about the workers who picked them for you.

Mary Rae Fouts

16 comments:

  1. Some farm tasks cannot be automated. How many people want the back breaking job of berry picking?

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    Replies
    1. Not many. That's why California agriculture is dependent on migrant farm workers, whether people like it or not. Much of this is truly back breaking work over long days, sometimes in questionable weather conditions.

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  2. What kind of strawberries do you grow? (in your picture)

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    1. I'd love to tell you what kind of strawberries are shown in the picture, but I truly don't remember. I have different varieties of strawberries growing in my garden areas, and didn't keep track of the exact types of plants planted where.

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  3. The rasberries I buy always get moldy fast. Don't know if the Driscoll brand is available where I live.

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    Replies
    1. A few things to try: (1) Keep the berries in the clam shell or other container that provides some air circulation. Don't stack the clam shell or other container against other items so as to prevent air circulation. (2) Don't wash the berries until right before you eat them. (3) If you do spot a soft or moldy berry in the storage container, remove it right away.

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  4. Are Driscolls berries organic?

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    Replies
    1. Some are. My local grocer Lunardi's market carries both organically- and conventionally-grown Driscoll's berries. The clam shell's berry description will tell you if the berries are organic or not.

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  5. Did Driscolls pay you or give you berries to write this? Your supposed to disclose any payment or items you got for free.

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    Replies
    1. "Your supposed to disclose any payment or items you got for free."

      - Duh. And the reason I didn't disclose anything, is there isn't anything to disclose. No payment and no free berries.

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  6. I wish I could grow strawberries like yours. I've used the special strawberry growing pot, they all died.

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    Replies
    1. Wouldn't recommend a strawberry pot, can't see how the plants would grow in those little side cut=outs. My strawberries are grown in both ground soil, and (much more so) in planters with potting soil and compost, all watered with recycled water. Have strawberries year round.

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  7. I wonder if Donald Trump realizes he might not have good strawberries to eat anymore if he builds his wall across the border with Mexico.

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    Replies
    1. Didn't want this to turn into a political post. But I'll answer by saying, "Probably not". But same is likely true with many people.

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  8. Do you think home grown strawberries taste different than store bought ones, even organic store bought ones?

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    Replies
    1. Yes, and so does my dog Sid. I've found that my organic, home grown strawberries are more flavorful and sweeter than store bought, even the organically grown Driscoll's strawberries. But I do have the advantage of picking those that are absolutely ripe, rinsing them, and eating them after picking. No time lag between picking in fields and getting to a grocer.

      Oh, and my Husky-mix Sid thinks the same thing. He will occasionally pick (very gently with his small front teeth) and eat a ripe strawberry from my gardens. However, he will not eat strawberries from any other source.

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Thanks for sharing your comments here! Mary Rae Fouts